2017-2018 Hayward Sustainability Speaker Series--Speaker List & Video Archive

The Hayward Sustainability Speaker Series is supported by a generous grant from Nancy Eccles and Homer M. Hayward Family Foundation.  Below are featured speakers and events in the 2017-2018 academic year.


The Sky is Not Falling, but the Seas are Rising

 

Dr. Brendan Kelly

Executive Director of the Study for Environmental
Arctic Change or SEARCH

Senior Fellow at the Center for the Blue Economy
Middlebury Institute

 

Event was held: Thursday, September 14, 2017 | 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Irvine Auditorium
Middlebury Institute of International Studies
499 Pierce Street, Monterey, 93940

Event Video:  The Sky is Not Falling, But Seas are Rising

 

About the Topic

A lecture and Q&A co-sponsored by the Citizens' Climate Lobby, the Center for the Blue Economy and the Hayward Sustainability Speaker Series.

What is up with our climate? Arctic ice is melting fast with global impacts on sea level, weather, and agriculture. What is happening now and what can we do to protect ourselves and future generations? What can we expect locally and globally in the coming decades?  Dr. Brendan P. Kelly, Arctic climate researcher will discuss past and present drivers of the earth’s changing climate. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Blue Economy and the Hayward Sustainability Speaker Series.

About the Speaker

Dr. Brendan P. Kelly is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Blue Economy (CBE), Middlebury Institute of International Studies (MIIS), and Executive Director of the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH), a U.S. program with a mission to study Arctic change through collaboration with the research community, funding agencies, and other stakeholders.

Dr. Kelly is a marine ecologist with a focus on sea ice environments. He has participated in and led collaborative research in the North Pacific Ocean, the Arctic Ocean, the Sea of Okhotsk, the Baltic Sea, and Antarctica. His career in Arctic research and policy includes serving on the faculty and administration of the University of Alaska, as a research scientist with NOAA’s National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Deputy Director of Arctic Sciences at the National Science Foundation, Chief Scientist of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and Assistant Director for Polar Science in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Currently, he serves on the National Academy of Sciences’ Polar Research Board and as a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Blue Economy, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.


Cheetahs and Humans: Sharing a Landscape

Dr. Laurie Marker

Founder and Executive Director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund

Event was held: Monday, October 9, 2017 | 6:30pm - 8:00pm

McGowan Building, Room 102
Middlebury Institute of International Studies
411 Pacific Street, Monterey, 93940

Event Video: Cheetahs and Humans Sharing a Landscape

 

About the Topic

In the last 100 years, over 90% of the cheetah population has been lost. This icon of speed has been fast racing toward extinction. The problem? People. Farmers kill cheetahs who threaten livestock. Dr. Laurie Marker witnessed this tension first-hand and founded the Cheetah Conservation Fund in 1990 in Namibia. With a unique approach that combines empowering farmers to harness the economic value of predators, to create new revenue streams, to protect their livestock through the use of guard dogs and non-lethal means, and to increase productivity and improve livestock management, the cheetah population in Namibia has stabilized at roughly 7,500 individuals.

The Cheetah Conservation Fund has demonstrated that predators, people and livestock can peacefully co-exist. As a result, Namibian livestock farmers’ attitudes toward the cheetah have evolved. The country’s wild cheetah population is poised to regenerate. Join us for this truly inspiring talk by Dr. Laurie Marker.

About the Speaker

Dr. Laurie Marker is an American conservation research scientist recognized as one of the world’s leading experts in human-carnivore conflict. In 1990, Dr. Marker established Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) and set up its international base in Otjiwarongo, Namibia. Under her leadership, CCF has grown into a world-class institution dedicated to research, education and conservation of the cheetah and its ecosystem. Today, CCF’s Centre is based on an integrated wildlife and livestock reserve that includes a 100,000-acre model farm used to train Namibians in best farming and natural resource management practices.

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Heating Up: Reports from the Front Lines of the Climate Fight

 

Bill McKibben
Author. Educator. Environmentalist. Founder and Executive Director, 350.org

Event was held Thursday, November 2, 2017 | 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Irvine Auditorium
Middlebury Institute of International Studies
499 Pierce Street, Monterey, 93940

EVENT VIDEO:  HEATING UP

 

About the Topic

Bill McKibben needs no introduction to the environmental community. The first author to bring the issue of climate change to the general public, Bill went on to co-found 350.org, the leading climate change advocacy organization in the world. He continues to lead the climate fight both at home and abroad. Bill will provide an update on the challenges ahead as the U.S. federal government is in the grips of the most anti-environmental administration in modern history.

About the Speaker

Bill McKibben is an author and environmentalist who in 2014 was awarded the Right Livelihood Prize, sometimes called the ‘alternative Nobel.’ His 1989 book The End of Nature is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has appeared in 24 languages; he’s gone on to write a dozen more books. He is a founder of 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement, which has organized twenty thousand rallies around the world in every country save North Korea, spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone Pipeline, and launched the fast-growing fossil fuel divestment movement.

The Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he was the 2013 winner of the Gandhi Prize and the Thomas Merton Prize, and holds honorary degrees from 18 colleges and universities. Foreign Policy named him to their inaugural list of the world’s 100 most important global thinkers, and the Boston Globe said he was “probably America’s most important environmentalist.”

A former staff writer for the New Yorker, he writes frequently for a wide variety of publications around the world, including the New York Review of Books,National Geographic, and Rolling Stone. He lives in the mountains above Lake Champlain with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern, where he spends as much time as possible outdoors. In 2014, biologists honored him by naming a new species of woodland gnat—Megophthalmidia mckibbeni—in his honor.

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